Dr Lyssa Logue's blog

Family Development Guide

For information regarding child development from birth through the teen years, as well as information on how to provide a nurturing and stimulating environment to foster this development, please check out this great online booklet:

Family Development Guide

If you prefer to copy and paste the link:
http://www.ounce.org/CAP2012/Parent_Booklet.pdf

This booklet also provides self-care tips for parents and providers, as well as tips for managing family life.

Prenatal Visit

Are you expecting? Congratulations! Choosing a pediatrician for your newest arrival is an important decision. We share your joy in this exciting time, and we look forward to the opportunity to partner with you in caring for your child.

Parents-to-be are encouraged to attend one of our complimentary prenatal meetings. These informal group sessions are a great way for you to meet one of our pediatricians, obtain information about how our office operates and receive a tour. You will also have the opportunity to ask any questions you may have. Sessions are held monthly at 5pm. The next meeting will be April 17, 2013. Please call our office at (727) 323-2727 to add your name to the list, or if you have any other questions!

Upon Arrival
If your baby is born at Bayfront Baby Place or St. Petersburg General Hospital, simply inform your obstetrician and the hospital staff that you have chosen one of our pediatricians to care for your child. Our office will be notified of your baby's birth, and one of our pediatricians will come to examine your baby daily until discharged home. Upon discharge, please make an appointment to have your little one seen in our office by calling (727) 323-2727.

If your baby is born at a different hospital, the attending pediatrician affiliated with that facility will care for your baby while in the hospital. Upon discharge, simply call our office to schedule a newborn visit.

Coughs and Colds

Tis the season for coughs and colds! Many people are tempted to give their children over the counter cough and cold medicines to make them feel better, but these medications can have serious side effects. Children younger than 4 years of age should never be given over the counter cough and cold medications. Children between the ages of 4 and 6 years of age should only be given OTC cough and cold medicines if recommended by your pediatrician. After the age of 6 years, OTC cough and cold medications are safe to use if the correct dosing on the packaging is followed.

Fortunately, there are some home remedies that are just as effective (or more effective) in providing some relief for your child:

1) Nasal congestion or stuffy nose: Nasal saline drops and spray.
For infants, instill 2 to 3 drops in each nostril. You may follow with bulb suction, or use saline alone. Saline drops should be used before feedings.
For older children, use a saline spray as needed for comfort throughout the day.

2) Runny nose: Bulb suction for infants and toddlers, or simply blowing gently with older children.

3) Cough:
For infants younger than 3 months: See your pediatrician.
For infants 3 months to 1 year of age: May use warm, clear fluids (water or apple juice) with dosage of 5 ml -15 ml (1 to 3 teaspoons) 4 times a day as needed for cough. AVOID HONEY in children under 1 year of age.
For children older than 1 year of age: Honey 1/2 teaspoon - 1 teaspoon as needed. Honey thins secretions and loosens the cough. Research studies have shown that honey is more effective than
OTC cough medicines in reducing night time coughing.

4) Fluids: It is important to give plenty of fluids to help thin secretions, making it easier to expel mucus.

5) Humidity: A cool mist humidifier used during sleep is helpful in keeping nasal mucus moist and secretions thin and easier to pass.

6) Fever: Tylenol and Ibuprofen (if over 6 months of age) can be used to treat fever. Fever is your body's natural way of fighting off infection, and should only be treated if it is causing your child discomfort, interrupts sleep or is slowing them down.

If symptoms are not bothering your child, there is no reason that they need to be treated. Many children are happy and playful even with a cough and congestion. Symptoms should be treated only if they cause discomfort, interrupt sleep, or cause them to slow down.

If your child is not improving from their cough or cold in 7-10 days, has persistent fever for more than 3-4 days, or has more significant complaints (ear pain, wheezing, refuses to drink, etc), they should be evaluated by your pediatrician.

Thanksgiving Safety Tips

Happy Thanksgiving! Many kids love to be involved with preparing the Thanksgiving feast. In order to ensure a happy and accident free holiday, here are some safety tips:

1) Stay in the home when cooking your turkey, and check it frequently.

2) Close supervision at all times. No child should be left alone in the kitchen, or be allowed to use the stove, oven or appliances.

3) Keep children away from the stove. Be sure to turn handles in so that they cannot be grabbed by little hands.

4) Keep children away from hot foods and liquids. Steam or splashing from hot liquids can cause serious burns. Never carry hot liquids while carrying a child.

5) Keep knives out of reach of children.

6) Be sure electric cords from appliances do not dangle off of countertops in the reach of children.

7) Never leave children alone in a room with a lit candle. Keep matches and lighters locked away and out of reach.

8) Avoid using placemats with children as they can pull the mat causing hot food to spill on them, causing injury.

9) Test your smoke detectors to be sure they are working.

10) Have a Happy Thanksgiving!!

Prenatal Visit

Are you expecting? Congratulations! Choosing a pediatrician for your newest arrival is an important decision. We share your joy in this exciting time, and we look forward to the opportunity to partner with you in caring for your child.

Parents-to-be are encouraged to attend one of our complimentary prenatal meetings. These informal group sessions are a great way for you to meet one of our pediatricians, obtain information about how our office operates and receive a tour. You will also have the opportunity to ask any questions you may have. Sessions are held monthly at 5pm. The next meeting will be December 12, 2012. Please call our office at (727) 323-2727 to add your name to the list, or if you have any other questions!

Upon Arrival
If your baby is born at Bayfront Baby Place or St. Petersburg General Hospital, simply inform your obstetrician and the hospital staff that you have chosen one of our pediatricians to care for your child. Our office will be notified of your baby's birth, and one of our pediatricians will come to examine your baby daily until discharged home. Upon discharge, please make an appointment to have your little one seen in our office by calling (727) 323-2727.

If your baby is born at a different hospital, the attending pediatrician affiliated with that facility will care for your baby while in the hospital. Upon discharge, simply call our office to schedule a newborn visit.

Prenatal Visit

Are you expecting? Congratulations! Choosing a pediatrician for your newest arrival is an important decision. We share your joy in this exciting time, and we look forward to the opportunity to partner with you in caring for your child.

Parents-to-be are encouraged to attend one of our complimentary prenatal meetings. These informal group sessions are a great way for you to meet one of our pediatricians, obtain information about how our office operates and receive a tour. You will also have the opportunity to ask any questions you may have. Sessions are held monthly at 5pm. The next meeting will be November 14, 2012. Please call our office at (727) 323-2727 to add your name to the list, or if you have any other questions!

Upon Arrival
If your baby is born at Bayfront Baby Place or St. Petersburg General Hospital, simply inform your obstetrician and the hospital staff that you have chosen one of our pediatricians to care for your child. Our office will be notified of your baby's birth, and one of our pediatricians will come to examine your baby daily until discharged home. Upon discharge, please make an appointment to have your little one seen in our office by calling (727) 323-2727.

If your baby is born at a different hospital, the attending pediatrician affiliated with that facility will care for your baby while in the hospital. Upon discharge, simply call our office to schedule a newborn visit.

Prenatal Visit

Are you expecting? Congratulations! Choosing a pediatrician for your newest arrival is an important decision. We share your joy in this exciting time, and we look forward to the opportunity to partner with you in caring for your child.

Parents-to-be are encouraged to attend one of our complimentary prenatal meetings. These informal group sessions are a great way for you to meet one of our pediatricians, obtain information about how our office operates and receive a tour. You will also have the opportunity to ask any questions you may have. Sessions are held monthly at 5pm. The next meeting will be October 17, 2012. Please call our office at (727) 323-2727 to add your name to the list, or if you have any other questions!

Upon Arrival
If your baby is born at Bayfront Baby Place or St. Petersburg General Hospital, simply inform your obstetrician and the hospital staff that you have chosen one of our pediatricians to care for your child. Our office will be notified of your baby's birth, and one of our pediatricians will come to examine your baby daily until discharged home. Upon discharge, please make an appointment to have your little one seen in our office by calling (727) 323-2727.

If your baby is born at a different hospital, the attending pediatrician affiliated with that facility will care for your baby while in the hospital. Upon discharge, simply call our office to schedule a newborn visit.

In the News: Arsenic in Rice Products

Consumer Reports published a report on September 19, 2012 concerning the amount of arsenic found in foods made from rice. Arsenic is a common metal that occurs naturally in the environment, and exists in both organic and inorganic forms. The inorganic form is toxic and carcinogenic. Along with occurring naturally, inorganic arsenic is also used for industrial purposes such as pest control, wood preservation, animal antimicrobial treatment, etc. which can lead to increased levels in the environment (water, soil, atmosphere).

Increased levels in the environment by way of natural occurrence and industrial purposes may lead to increased levels in food and water supply. The report published by Consumer Reports found measurable sources of both forms of arsenic in 223 samples of rice products (crackers, cereals, brown and white rice). There are currently no FDA standards to limit the amount of arsenic in foods, although there are FDA limits for the amount in drinking water. The concern with this finding is that the presence of organic arsenic in commonly consumed foods may increase the lifetime risk of cancer.

Currently, more investigation needs to be done before any recommendations regarding the amount of rice products consumed are made. The FDA is currently studying the levels of arsenic in foods, and we eagerly await these findings. The FDA does not recommend any changes in current intake for rice products based on this preliminary information. Based on this report, the American Academy of Pediatrics continues to encourage a well balanced diet with a variety of foods offered to children, including rice, oatmeal, wheat products, fruits, vegetables and meat.

For more information, please see the following links:

Consumer Reports: http://tinyurl.com/cojaxfl

Healthy Children: http://tinyurl.com/bwoez8q

AAP News: http://tinyurl.com/c2yulx3

Learning about Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

ADHD is a disorder that causes inappropriate inattention, impulsivity, and in some cases, hyperactivity. Recent studies indicate that 8-10% of the population is affected. It is proven that there is a strong genetic link. In families without an affected close family member, the cause can be multifactorial

In order to be diagnosed with ADHD the child needs to be inattentive in more than one setting. If the child is focused at home, but struggles in school, it is possible the child has a learning disability. If the child struggles at home, but has no problems in school, a social stressor in the home may be the cause of inattention.

To diagnose a child with ADHD, a comprehensive evaluation must be done. This includes a full history and physical exam by a physician Rating scales are used to evaluate for ADHD. These are completed by parents and teachers. The checklist allows physicians to evaluate the severity of the symptoms. Our office often uses Vanderbilt forms for assessment. These can be downloaded from a PDF on our website. There are different forms for parents and teachers.

If the history and forms are consistent with the diagnosis of ADHD, treatment has multiple facets. Parent education and behavior modification are important components. The doctor may prescribe medication. The risks and benefits would be discussed prior to starting treatment. Some medications are controlled substances that require a new prescription each month. Children on medication also must been seen by a physician every three months to be monitored for efficacy, side effects or problems.

There are resources that parents can access for additional information about ADHD. CHADD (Children and Adults with Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder) is a non-profit organization that can be accessed online. Additional references include ADHD: What Every Parent Should Know, by the American Academy of Pediatrics, as well as ADHD and Me, by Blake Taylor.

If you are concerned that your child may have this disorder, please contact our office to schedule an evaluation.

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